rajasthan india things to do
Rajasthan is India’s largest state. It offers up a multitude of interesting things to see and do during your time there. Here are four fun things to not miss while you’re there.

Shopping in Jaipur

The Jaipur Bazaar is well known as “THE” place to shop in Rajasthan. Held within the wall of Jaipur’s Old Town, the market is filled with hundreds of shopkeepers. Textiles spices, tea by the sack, and silversmiths all sell their wares there. There are also numerous types of foods to enjoy while you shop. The textiles are particularly interesting as many are handmade block prints from local villages. The lakh bangles are another local artisan creation that helps support locals when you buy them.

Pushkar Lake

Pushkar is one of the oldest towns in India and one of the most serene. After a day of shopping in Jaipur, the quiet elegance of Pushkar will be welcome. There are no trains here and vehicles are not allowed in all areas. Walking is the way most people get from place to place in this town. Pushkar Sarovar is the sacred lake this town is built around with 52 bathing ghats and 500 temples surrounding the lake. Be sure to observe local culture when you visit, alcohol and meat are forbidden and visitors should wear full-length clothing.

See some Tigers in Ranthambore

Ranthambore National Park has three national tiger reserves. While there’s no guarantee you will see a tiger, there are over 300 species of deciduous trees and absolutely breathtaking views. Sometimes all you will get to photograph are tiger paw prints, but sometimes there are lucky moments when one of the reserve’s tigers will peek out to see a tour.

Romance at the Lake in Udaipur

Lake Pichola is a man-made lake, that has white marble bathing ghats, rolling hills, and lush trees all around. There are also boat rides available to take in the serene beauty of the shoreline from the water. This lake was made in the 1300s when the ruling Maharana fell in love with the area. If you want to spend the night, stay in the five-star luxury hotel, the Floating Lake Palace.

Pichola is the oldest lake in Udaipur, constructed in the 1300s when the ruling Maharana fell in love with the area. The lake is in the middle of the city and provides a fantastic view of Udaipur City Palace and the floating Lake Palace, Udaipur’s famed luxury five-star hotel.

Rajasthan has so much to see and do. Those are just four fun things to see and do during your time there. Indian travels visas can be exacting to get, talk to us – we can make the process fast and easy.

Cuba has been open for tourism for a while now, and we wanted to share some of the most common questions we get from individuals seeking their travel visas. Cuba has some unique requirements for issuing travel visas, and outsourcing the task can definitely free up your time to plan your time in Cuba.

What are the U.S. passport requirements for Americans visiting Cuba?
Your passport must be valid at the time of entry, and two pages are required for entry/exit stamps.

Will I need a tourist visa to visit Cuba?
Yes. Although, technically tourist travel to Cuba remains prohibited. Your travel must fall into one of 12 categories of authorized travel. We can help you with that.

Are any vaccinations required to visit Cuba?
Currently, no vaccinations are required, but Hepatitis A is often recommended as water and foods may be contaminated. Dengue fever and the Zika virus are also prevalent.

Is it true U.S. credit cards don’t work in Cuba?
It’s true. U.S. credit and debit cards do not work in Cuba. You will need to bring cash to cover your stay. The Cuban government will require tourists to declare any amounts over $5000 USD. Another point to note is that the Cuban government charges a 10% fee for all conversations from U.S. dollars, excluding electronic transactions or cash conversions in other currencies. When exchanging currency, use the state-run offices known as CADECAs.

Can I bring Cuban pesos back to the U.S.?
It’s probably better not to try. Travelers may only export the equivalent of 5,000 USD in any currency other than the Cuban convertible pesos (CUC). Anyone wishing to export more than this amount must demonstrate evidence that the currency was acquired legitimately from a Cuban bank. (Source: U.S. State Department)

Is Cuba safe?
Cuba is relatively stable and characterized by a strong military and police presence. According to the State Department, the U.S. government rates the threat of crime in Cuba as medium. With the recent influx of tourists to the island, there has been an increase in the number of property crimes, as well as violent crimes. Crimes of opportunity, such as purse snatchings and car break-ins, are on the rise. Overall, Cuba is a safe place to visit, but caution needs to be exercised as in any country you are visiting.

If you’re heading to Cuba and still need to renew/obtain your U.S. passport and travel visa, talk to us – we can make the process fast and easy.

Everyone knows when you travel you shouldn’t dress like a tourist, but what are some other things around the world that might shock a traveler from another country. Customs will be different in every country, here are some eye openers experienced by other travelers.

In Finland, an exchange student from India was shocked to discover that mixed-gender saunas were a thing, and then after a sauna, rolling in the snow is common.

A traveler in Ethiopia recounted when she was working for the Peace Corps and was staying with a family. They made her a dinner of white rice and copious amounts of salt (they heard Americans liked salt on all their food.) Then they hugged her and told her they loved her. The traveler said you will never experience family love like they have in Ethiopia.

Taking an hour or two off in the afternoon is common in Italy.

The most trustworthy place to be a tourist would have to hands-down be in Iceland. Read this account from a traveler, “My friend and I were walking around Reykjavik, Iceland and we came across a stroller next to a small shop with a baby in it all bundled up. It was a bit brisk but otherwise not too cold. The issue was that there was no one near this seemingly abandoned child. We walked about 50 feet up and down the road looking for the parent of this child.

Turns out the mother was just in the store across the street. It is perfectly acceptable to leave your unattended infant on the sidewalk apparently. Crime rates are so low in Iceland that the people there are much more trusting of each other I suppose.

In Beijing, you might see something called the “Beijing Bikini.” Older men tuck the bottom of their shirts into the collar to expose their stomachs.

Do you want new friends? Go to Tanzania. A traveler that went there alone for a research project, realized very quickly that people on the street were walking up to start conversations. When they said, “Come to my house for dinner.” It meant right then. After a few months, the researcher said he went from knowing no one in Tanzania to calling dozens of people friends.

A traveler that spent two months in Malawi, Africa said it is not uncommon for men to hold hands as they walk together down the road. This is just an indication of friendship and not romantic involvement.

In Taiwan, don’t be surprised if you wake up in the morning to a garbage truck playing “Für Elise” as they do their rounds.

So there are a few of the things you might run into when you travel. Another good way to avoid looking like a tourist when you travel. Read about some of the cultural nuances of wherever you choose to visit and you’ll fit right in like a local.