How Not to Go to Jail in Cuba and Can U.S Citizens Still Travel There?

cuba travel

There is a proposed travel ban for Cuba, while it wouldn’t shut off the ability to visit – it does change some of the permissible reasons for visiting Cuba. If you’re planning a trip to Cuba, talk to us about your passport and visa.

Also, it is worth noting Cuba is very strict about its CUC currency leaving the country, As one traveler experienced recently and nearly went to jail.

Questions and Answers about Cuban Travel

What are the U.S. passport requirements for Americans visiting Cuba?
Your passport must be valid at the time of entry, and two pages are required for entry/exit stamps.

Will I need a tourist visa to visit Cuba?
Yes. Although, technically tourist travel to Cuba remains prohibited. Your travel must fall into one of 12 categories of authorized travel. If the changes proposed by Washington go through, two reasons will be removed.

Are any vaccinations required to visit Cuba?
Currently, no vaccinations are required, but Hepatitis A is often recommended as water and foods may be contaminated. Dengue fever and the Zika virus are also prevalent.

Is it true U.S. credit cards don’t work in Cuba?
It’s true. U.S. credit and debit cards do not work in Cuba. You will need to bring cash to cover your stay. The Cuban government will require tourists to declare any amounts over $5000 USD. Another point to note is that the Cuban government charges a 10% fee for all conversations from U.S. dollars, excluding electronic transactions or cash conversions in other currencies. When exchanging currency, use the state-run offices known as CADECAs.

Can I bring Cuban pesos back to the U.S.?
It’s probably better not to try. Travelers may only export the equivalent of 5,000 USD in any currency other than the Cuban convertible pesos (CUC). Anyone wishing to export more than this amount must demonstrate evidence that the currency was acquired legitimately from a Cuban bank. (Source: U.S. State Department)

Is Cuba safe?
Cuba is relatively stable and characterized by a strong military and police presence. According to the State Department, the U.S. government rates the threat of crime in Cuba as a medium. With the recent influx of tourists to the island, there has been an increase in the number of property crimes, as well as violent crimes. Crimes of opportunity, such as purse snatchings and car break-ins, are on the rise. Overall, Cuba is a safe place to visit, but caution needs to be exercised as in any country you are visiting.

If you’re heading to Cuba and still need to renew/obtain your U.S. passport and travel visa, talk to us – we can make the process fast and easy.

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